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Falkirk

Our Doors Open Days weekend is 12th and 13th September.

Don't forget to leave us feedback on your experiences of Doors Open Days by completing our visitor survey.  you could even win a prize!

 

Falkirk

Bo'ness Recreation Centre

The buildings were designed for the sloping site in Gauze Road by Alison, Hutchison & Partners in 1972 for Central Regional Council and opened in 1976. The exterior features an open scale and platt staircase and ramp access to the main entrance on the first floor. Described by one architect as a “metal box” it has large areas of windows, typical of this period. It houses meeting rooms, games rooms and a swimming pool, with tennis and football pitches outside. These facilities support indoor bowling, football, keep fit classes, badminton, the 50+ club, yoga, squash, and so on. The main feature is the swimming pool measuring 25m x 12.5m with six lanes and a large viewing area for up to 60 spectators. This allows a wide range of water based activities to take place – not just swimming, but also synchronised swimming and sub-aqua diving. The pool is set in a thick concrete trough terraced into the hill slope with most of it set above ground on a supporting frame. Some water leaches though the concrete, carrying with it calcium, to form small stalactites on the outer face. Even though the water comes from the mains it is filtered in large containers to remove small particles and chemically treated to kill bacteria and remove parasites like Cryptosporidium. Infamously chlorine is added, find out why and how. Due to the restricted spaces involved there is no wheelchair access. Courtesy of Falkirk Community Trust & the management of the Recreation Centre.

Falkirk

Callendar House Archives

In the west wing of Callendar House lies the Searchroom for Falkirk Archives, containing collections relating to the Falkirk area and its people. It is located in the oldest part of the house. When the Forbes family was in residence it was used as a library whilst the adjacent archival storage area was a ladies’ parlour. The current design of the library dates from 1830 and was created by David Hamilton, who also designed the Steeple and Larbert Church. It has original oak panelled walls with an elegant barrel-vaulted ceiling. The wood is said to be from the family estates in the south of Scotland. A large mirror at one end reflects the repeated rectangular shapes of the bronze screens and coffering of the ceiling, thereby exaggerating the length of the narrow room. The room is north facing which helps to keep the contents cool, both in Forbes’ time and ours, as well as contributing to the visual mood of the room. This special weekend opening of Falkirk Archives also opens up a lesser known aspect of archival collecting - displaying material one might not expect to find in an archive such as sound and film recordings. This was highlighted by a recent BBC documentary on the BA Cowboys! Callendar House is open free throughout the year and has permanent displays of Roman material, as well as a large late 18th century kitchen and beautiful grounds. Courtesy of Falkirk Community Trust.

Falkirk

Christ Church

Designed by R Rowand Anderson in a relatively plain Gothic style and completed in 1864, the exterior of this church belies the homely extravagance of the polychrome interior. It is lined with yellow-brown glazed bricks with red bands three bricks deep. The window arches and chamfered sills are also red and the chancel has square moulded tiles. A panelled oak dado extends round the whole interior. The nave has an open scissor truss roof; whilst the ceiling of the chancel is painted pale blue with stencilled stars. The chancel arch springs from attached pillars that stand on carved corbels with naturalistic foliage. Within the arch is set a wrought iron screen, made in 1897 by the Carron Company. It was heavily pruned in the 1960s and the cross that surmounted it was suspended from the arch.  In the Lady Chapel there is a wooden altar dedicated to those of the congregation who fell in the First World War, with front panels painted with scenes from the life of Christ. Hinged side panels have been added with the names of those who died in the Second World War. This was the first war memorial to be erected in Falkirk. Stained glass colours the light streaming in through the windows.

Erskine Community Halls looking NE.

Falkirk

Erskine Community Halls

Designed by William Black of Messrs A. & W. Black, architects, Falkirk, the Erskine Church was built in 1905. It is in the Gothic style of architecture of the Perpendicular period, with a square tower at the south-west corner some 90 ft tall. The south gable presents a five light tracery window and twin doors to the street, approached by an imposing broad flight of steps. The church is cruciform in plan, with nave, aisles, chancel and two shallow transepts. There are galleries over the end of the nave and each of the transepts. A creamy sandstone from Eastfield Quarry was used. Internally the bases of the pillars are of freestone but the walls and ceiling have been finished with lathe and plaster. Behind the church and communicating with it is a hall to accommodate 200 people, a smaller hall, vestry, session room, ladies room, waiting room, kitchen and offices. The total cost of the building was put at £9248. The building ceased functioning as a church in 2014 and is used as community halls. It now provides a great venue for functions. Courtesy of The Erskine Community Halls.

Falkirk

Falkirk Football Stadium

Falkirk Stadium is home to the Scottish Championship club, Falkirk FC, and has a capacity of 7,937. Work began on building the stadium in 2003 after Brockville Park, the club's town centre home since 1885, was sold and demolished. The new stadium was opened in 2004 with the main stand completed. It was designed by Falkirk Council architects and constructed by Mowlem. The main façade faces west towards the town and is dominated by four apsidal metal sheeted stairwells and horizontal bands of powder blue-tinted windows. The north and south stands were built and opened in 2005 and 2009 respectively. The project of building the stadium started as a partnership between Falkirk Football Club and Falkirk Council who set up the Falkirk Community Stadium Ltd. Falkirk's first ever game at the stadium was a friendly in July 2004 against Dundee resulting in a 2–1 defeat (but we don’t mention that). The second stand to the north of the pitch has a capacity of 2,000 and its completion brought the stadium's capacity to over the Scottish Premier League's 6,000 seating criteria, meaning Falkirk was allowed automatic promotion from the First Division. The stand received its safety certificate in late March 2005, shortly before the SPL's deadline. An artificial playing surface was installed at the stadium in June 2013. In 2016 Lowland Football League side Stirling University FC started playing their home matches at the ground, having moved from Stirling Albion's Forthbank Stadium. Likewise, in April 2018 it was announced that East Stirlingshire would begin playing their home matches at the Falkirk Stadium from the start of the 2018–19 season. The club had previously played in the town at Firs Park until 2008, before spending a decade ground-sharing with Stenhousemuir at Ochilview Park. Courtesy of Falkirk Football Club.

Falkirk

Falkirk Masonic Temple

In 1903 Lint Riggs was reconstructed using design parameters laid down by burgh engineer David Ronald and it is consequently the most architecturally consistent street in the area with a Continental feel.  The dominant building is the Masonic Temple with its classical Corinthian style under a balustrade.  It is the only Masonic Temple in the district and was completed in 1906 for Lodge Callendar No.588, the second lodge of freemasons to be established in the town. The internal decoration and furnishing is very interesting, especially the five outstanding painted windows with their floral patterns; each represents a Principal Office Bearer namely - The Right Worshipful Master in the centre flanked on either side by the Worshipful Senior and Junior Wardens. The two Wardens are flanked on their other side by windows representing the Senior and Junior Deacons. All in all this is an exceptional masonic lodge building. 

Falkirk

Falkirk Steeple

Completed in 1814 according to designs by David Hamilton of Glasgow the Steeple is the iconic landmark of the town. 140ft tall, it has four stages – the bottom being severe Florentine; the second Greek Doric; the third or clock chamber Italianate; and the belfry Ionic. It was constructed to house the town’s bell and clock, as well as containing temporary lockups. The design was a reflection of civic pride. The original Steeple on the site was erected in 1697 and was the first building to be owned by the Stentmasters – the precursor of the town council. The building has just been completely refurbished as part of the Townscape Heritage Initiative and later this month, a new display will be installed to tell the story of the jail and the market square. You will be able to see the plans for this display which will include the bell of 1697.

Larbert Old parish Church looking east fromt he churchyard

Falkirk

Larbert Old Parish Church

This prominent landmark dominates the skyline for miles around. The church opened in 1821 at a cost of £4,400. Its architect, David Hamilton, also designed Falkirk Steeple. The style is Gothic with prominent crocketed finials on the corner buttresses and the west tower. The tower contains the main entrance and opens into a vaulted vestibule from which stairs rise to right and left to the gallery landings. Between the stepped buttresses are tall traceried windows, many of which now contain stained glass. The styles are varied and well worth a visit in their own right. The approach from the main road is between chamfered sandstone gatepiers with crenellated polished ashlar caps and decorative cast-iron gas lamp fittings. On the left is a pink granite marble fountain with a shallow bowl on a turned circular plinth, presented in 1923. On the right is the 1905 hall, designed by P. MacGregor Chalmers.

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Area Coordinator

  • Geoff Bailey
  • Falkirk Community Trust