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Falkirk

Falkirk

Bo'ness Recreation Centre

Date 1: 15/09/2018
Date 2: 16/09/2018
Tags:

new

15-16 September 2018

The buildings were designed for the sloping site in Gauze Road by Alison, Hutchison & Partners in 1972 for Central Regional Council and opened in 1976. The exterior features an open scale and platt staircase and ramp access to the main entrance on the first floor. Described by one architect as a “metal box” it has large areas of windows, typical of this period. It houses meeting rooms, games rooms and a swimming pool, with tennis and football pitches outside. These facilities support indoor bowling, football, keep fit classes, badminton, the 50+ club, yoga, squash, and so on. The main feature is the swimming pool measuring 25m x 12.5m with six lanes and a large viewing area for up to 60 spectators. This allows a wide range of water based activities to take place – not just swimming, but also synchronised swimming and sub-aqua diving. The pool is set in a thick concrete trough terraced into the hill slope with most of it set above ground on a supporting frame. Some water leaches though the concrete, carrying with it calcium, to form small stalactites on the outer face. Even though the water comes from the mains it is filtered in large containers to remove small particles and chemically treated to kill bacteria and remove parasites like Cryptosporidium. Infamously chlorine is added, find out why and how. This is an unusual opportunity to see the swimming pool from below and hear about the requisite treatment and its plant. Due to the restricted spaces involved there is no wheelchair access and visits will be by conducted tours. Courtesy of Falkirk Community Trust & the management of the Recreation Centre. Café with special offers on the day

Falkirk

Callendar House Archives

Date 1: 15/09/2018
Date 2: 01/01/0001
Tags:

new

15 September 2018

In the west wing of Callendar House lies the Searchroom for Falkirk Archives, providing access during the week to the collections relating to the Falkirk area and its people. It is located in the oldest part of the house. When the Forbes family was in residence it was used as a library whilst the adjacent archival storage area was a ladies’ parlour. The current design of the library dates from 1830 and was created by David Hamilton, who also designed the Steeple and Larbert Church. It has original oak panelled walls with an elegant barrel-vaulted ceiling. The wood is said to be from the family estates in the south of Scotland. A large mirror at one end reflects the repeated rectangular shapes of the bronze screens and coffering of the ceiling, thereby exaggerating the length of the narrow room. The room is north facing which helps to keep the contents cool, both in Forbes’ time and ours, as well as contributing to the visual mood of the room. This special weekend opening is also part of the Big Roman Week and there will be a special display of some of the antiquarian reports and drawings related to the Antonine Wall. Mungo Buchanan was a draughtsman with the Falkirk Iron Company, and his record of work at Camelon, Rough Castle and Castlecary, is essential to our understanding of the Roman frontier. Callendar House is open free throughout the year and has permanent displays of Roman material, as well as a large late 18th century kitchen and beautiful grounds. Courtesy of Falkirk Community Trust.

Falkirk

Christ Church

Date 1: 15/09/2018
Date 2: 16/09/2018
Tags:

15-16 September 2018

 Designed by R Rowand Anderson in a relatively plain Gothic style and completed in 1864, the exterior of this church belies the homely extravagance of the polychrome interior. It is lined with yellow-brown glazed bricks with red bands three bricks deep. The window arches and chamfered sills are also red and the chancel has square moulded tiles. A panelled oak dado extends round the whole interior. The nave has an open scissor truss roof; whilst the ceiling of the chancel is painted pale blue with stencilled stars. The chancel arch springs from attached pillars that stand on carved corbels with naturalistic foliage. Within the arch is set a wrought iron screen, made in 1897 by the Carron Company. It was heavily pruned in the 1960s and the cross that surmounted it was suspended from the arch.  In the Lady Chapel there is a wooden altar dedicated to those of the congregation who fell in the First World War, with front panels painted with scenes from the life of Christ. Hinged side panels have been added with the names of those who died in the Second World War. This was the first war memorial to be erected in Falkirk. Stained glass colours the light streaming in through the windows.   Open courtesy of Christ Church. Wheelchair access to the nave & aisle. Parking in the town centre.  

Erskine Community Halls looking NE.

Falkirk

Erskine Community Halls

Date 1: 16/09/2017
Date 2: 01/01/0001
Tags:

16 September 2017

Designed by William Black of Messrs A. & W. Black, architects, Falkirk, the Erskine Church was built in 1905. It is in the Gothic style of architecture of the Perpendicular period, with a square tower at the south-west corner some 90 ft tall. The south gable presents a five light tracery window and twin doors to the street, approached by an imposing broad flight of steps. The church is cruciform in plan, with nave, aisles, chancel and two shallow transepts. There are galleries over the end of the nave and each of the transepts. A creamy sandstone from Eastfield Quarry was used. Internally the bases of the pillars are of freestone but the walls and ceiling have been finished with lathe and plaster. Behind the church and communicating with it is a hall to accommodate 200 people, a smaller hall, vestry, session room, ladies room, waiting room, kitchen and offices. The total cost of the building was put at £9248. The building ceased functioning as a church in 2014 and is used as community halls. It now provides a great venue for functions. Courtesy of The Erskine Community Halls.

Falkirk

Falkirk Football Stadium

Date 1: 16/09/2018
Date 2: 01/01/0001
Tags:

new

16 September 2018

Falkirk Stadium is home to the Scottish Championship club, Falkirk FC, and has a capacity of 7,937. Work began on building the stadium in 2003 after Brockville Park, the club's town centre home since 1885, was sold and demolished. The new stadium was opened in 2004 with the main stand completed. It was designed by Falkirk Council architects and constructed by Mowlem. The main façade faces west towards the town and is dominated by four apsidal metal sheeted stairwells and horizontal bands of powder blue-tinted windows. The north and south stands were built and opened in 2005 and 2009 respectively. The project of building the stadium started as a partnership between Falkirk Football Club and Falkirk Council who set up the Falkirk Community Stadium Ltd. Falkirk's first ever game at the stadium was a friendly in July 2004 against Dundee resulting in a 2–1 defeat (but we don’t mention that). The second stand to the north of the pitch has a capacity of 2,000 and its completion brought the stadium's capacity to over the Scottish Premier League's 6,000 seating criteria, meaning Falkirk was allowed automatic promotion from the First Division. The stand received its safety certificate in late March 2005, shortly before the SPL's deadline. An artificial playing surface was installed at the stadium in June 2013. In 2016 Lowland Football League side Stirling University FC started playing their home matches at the ground, having moved from Stirling Albion's Forthbank Stadium. Likewise, in April 2018 it was announced that East Stirlingshire would begin playing their home matches at the Falkirk Stadium from the start of the 2018–19 season. The club had previously played in the town at Firs Park until 2008, before spending a decade ground-sharing with Stenhousemuir at Ochilview Park. Courtesy of Falkirk Football Club.

Falkirk

Falkirk Masonic Temple

Date 1: 15/09/2018
Date 2: 16/09/2018
Tags:

15-16 September 2018

In 1903 Lint Riggs was reconstructed using design parameters laid down by burgh engineer David Ronald and it is consequently the most architecturally consistent street in the area with a Continental feel.  The dominant building is the Masonic Temple with its classical Corinthian style under a balustrade.  It is the only Masonic Temple in the district and was completed in 1906 for Lodge Callendar No.588, the second lodge of freemasons to be established in the town. The internal decoration and furnishing is very interesting, especially the five outstanding painted windows with their floral patterns; each represents a Principal Office Bearer namely - The Right Worshipful Master in the centre flanked on either side by the Worshipful Senior and Junior Wardens. The two Wardens are flanked on their other side by windows representing the Senior and Junior Deacons. All in all this is an exceptional masonic lodge building. 

Falkirk

Falkirk Steeple

Date 1: 15/09/2018
Date 2: 16/09/2018
Tags: Weekend 3 (15-16 September)

15-16 September 2018

Completed in 1814 according to designs by David Hamilton of Glasgow the Steeple is the iconic landmark of the town. 140ft tall, it has four stages – the bottom being severe Florentine; the second Greek Doric; the third or clock chamber Italianate; and the belfry Ionic. It was constructed to house the town’s bell and clock, as well as containing temporary lockups. The design was a reflection of civic pride. The original Steeple on the site was erected in 1697 and was the first building to be owned by the Stentmasters – the precursor of the town council. The building has just been completely refurbished as part of the Townscape Heritage Initiative. Further work is in train to provide interpretation for the interior.

The old town hall in Newmarket Street - demolished.

Falkirk

Falkirk Town Centre

Date 1: 16/09/2017
Date 2: 17/09/2017
Tags:

new

16-17 September 2017

As part of the Falkirk Townscape Initiative there will be a temporary exhibition and a guided walk to illustrate and explore the lost and living history of the town centre. The THI is a grant-giving scheme funded by Falkirk Council, HLF, Historic Environment Scotland and others, that has seen £5.5 million invested in Falkirk Town Centre between 2013 and 2018. The aim is to help regenerate the area through investing in its unique and rich heritage. Lost Falkirk Exhibition, Howgate Shopping Centre,Falkirk (tbc) Saturday: 10am - 4pm Sunday: Noon - 4pm Explore the lost and hidden histories of Falkirk town centre at this free exhibition. Supported by Falkirk Townscape Heritage Initiative (THI). (Please note this is a special Sunday opening). Falkirk THI Talks Falkirk Trinity Church, High Street Saturday: 10.30am Steeple Restoration in Focus The Steeple restoration works are complete. But what actually happened? Join ZM Architecture the architects on the project and find out more about the work. Saturday: 12.30pm 3D Scanning and the Built Environment New technologies are being used to record the built environment. Join Professor Douglas Pritchard who will explain how these techniques are being used for architecture, design and heritage conservation. Drop in LEGO Event - Let’s Build! Howgate Shopping Centre Saturday & Sunday 11am-3pm Come along to our builder’s yard and get creative with LEGO! Try to create a local shop, building or just have fun with bricks! This is part of the Falkirk Townscape Heritage Initiative (THI). All ages Free Falkirk Town Centre Heritage Walks Saturday: Noon, 2pm & 4pm Sunday: 2pm & 4pm Meet at the Cross at Falkirk Trinity Church Stroll into the past with our Tour Guides and find out more about the rich heritage of Falkirk Town Centre. Supported by Falkirk Townscape Heritage Initiative (THI).

Falkirk

Kinneil House

Date 1: 15/09/2018
Date 2: 01/01/0001
Tags: Weekend 3 (15-16 September)

15 September 2018

Set within a carefully designed park landscape Kinneil House or Palace was built for James Hamilton the second Earl of Arran when he was the Protector and Governor of Scotland from 1542 to 1554 during the minority of Mary, Queen of Scots. It still houses the best 16th and 17th century murals in Scotland. The bed chamber is now known as the Arbour room and the painting is full of foliage, scrolls and animals. This was later painted over in imitation of wainscoting and a coffered ceiling containing the 1621 coat of arms of Arran. The withdrawing chamber has a number of biblical scenes on the walls, notably the Good Samaritan. Last year access was created to extra rooms in the residential wing and to the ground floor of the tower house – meaning there is even more to see! In 1677 Anne Duchess of Hamilton began a programme of renovation, producing the house and grounds as they appear today. By the late 18th century the house was being let. Dr John Roebuck lived here 1764-94 and invited James Watt to perfect his separate condenser here. Dugald Stewart the philosopher was another famous tenant 1809-1828 and has a memorial on Carlton Hill in Edinburgh. The grounds are also the setting for events connected with the Roman Week, which runs from 16 - 24 September. The Antonine Wall runs close to the House and the remains of a Roman fortlet can be seen. There is also a 12th century church. There is also a 12th century church. Kinneil Museum, located in the old coachhouse, is open from 12.00-4.00pm. Free tickets for tours of the House will be available on the day from the Museum.

Larbert Old parish Church looking east fromt he churchyard

Falkirk

Larbert Old Parish Church

Date 1: 15/09/2018
Date 2: 16/09/2018
Tags: Weekend 3 (15-16 September)

15-16 September 2018

prominent landmark and dominates the skyline for miles around. The church opened in 1821 at a cost of £4,400. Its architect, David Hamilton, also designed Falkirk Steeple. The style is Gothic with prominent crocketed finials on the corner buttresses and the west tower. The tower contains the main entrance and opens into a vaulted vestibule from which stairs rise to right and left to the gallery landings. Between the stepped buttresses are tall traceried windows, many of which now contain stained glass. The styles are varied and well worth a visit in their own right. The approach from the main road is between chamfered sandstone gatepiers with crenellated polished ashlar caps and decorative cast-iron gas lamp fittings. On the left is a pink granite marble fountain with a shallow bowl on a turned circular plinth, presented in 1923. On the right is the 1905 hall, designed by P. MacGregor Chalmers. On the Saturday morning there will be an organ recital in the church. Guided tours of the churchyard will take in many fascinating aspects of local as well as national history, and of art. The latter includes some idiosyncratic poetry set in stone, as well as statues by leading sculptors.

Stainton Column

Falkirk

Larbert Old Parish Churchyard

Date 1: 15/09/2018
Date 2: 01/01/0001
Tags: Weekend 3 (15-16 September)

15 September 2018

Adjacent to the parish church is a burial ground whose magnificent monuments neatly encapsulate the advent of the Industrial Revolution in Scotland. They are dominated by those relating to the Carron Ironworks, which was established in 1759. The large edifices to its managers range from an Italianate tomb, to a huge urned column and a Roman temple. Cast iron features strongly throughout the graveyard with elaborate railings and obelisks. The Carron Enclosure contains beautiful examples of public art, including two tombs designed by John Hutchison of Edinburgh, one of the most famous sculptors of the late 19th century. In its own separate enclosure stood the earliest cast iron funerary obelisk anywhere in the world. It commemorates the most famous Scottish explorer of his generation, as recorded on its panels: “James Bruce esq of Kinnaird,/ who died on the 27th of April 1794,/ in the 64th year of his age/ his life was spent performing/ usefull, and splendid actions/ he explored many distant regions./ He discovered the fountains of the Nile.,/ He traversed the deserts of Nubia.” Although the graveyard is open all the year round, guided tours will be conducted on the Saturday of the opening of the church. Courtesy of the congregation of Larbert Old Church.

SPS image

Falkirk

Polmont Young Offenders Institution

Date 1: 16/09/2018
Date 2: 01/01/0001
Tags:

16 September 2018

This venue is now fully booked for the 2018 season! Her Majesty's Young Offenders Institution Polmont is Scotland's national facility for young men aged between 16 and 21 years who are committed to custody on remand (untried) and convicted sentences. The Scottish Government invested in a comprehensive rebuild of HMYOI Polmont, which was completed approximately 4 years ago. Polmont’s position has provided a unique opportunity to deliver the Scottish Prison Service’s vision of Unlocking Potential and Transforming Lives. For Polmont, the Vision for Young People in custody is: “To use the time a young person spends in custody to enable them to prepare for a positive future” making every contact an opportunity to learn. This vision recognises that some their time in custody may represent a chance - a rare chance - for them to engage in education or find someone who can help to point them to a better future. In addition, the approach seeks to mitigate the negative aspects of custody. Visitors will be guided around the facilities such as the occupational hall where the young men are given training in construction trades, industrial cleaning, hairdressing, engineering, gardens, forklift and road safety, and so on, fulfilling the mission role “Unlocking potential – transforming lives”. Here tea/coffee will be served. A sample of the accommodation and the games hall will also be on show. The closing date for requests will be Friday 13th July. The contact details for booking this visit are Donna.Gray@sps.pnn.gov.uk or Gayle.Haggerwood@sps.pnn.gov.uk . The details need to include 1. Full Name – Age (only over 16s will be allowed entry) 2. Home address 3. Daytime contact telephone number 4. Any health and safety considerations, i.e. wheelchair user etc.

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Area Coordinator

  • Geoff Bailey
  • Falkirk Community Trust