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Clackmannanshire

Doors Open Days in Clackmannanshire is coordinated by Clackmannanshire Heritage Trust, with some  support from Clackmannanshire Council. There will be guided tours of Alloa, Clackmannan and Sauchie Towers. Clackmannan Heritage Walks will explore the fascinating story of the village. St Mungo's Parish Church in Alloa continues to celebrate its Bicentenary; all of the churches taking part are well worth a visit to discover their stories and splendid interiors.

Popular destinations  Alloa Fire Station, The Coach House Theatre, Alva Ice House and the Johnstone Mausoleum, Dollar Museum and Tullibody Heritage Centre will also welcome people again.

Highlights and new this year is Clackmannanshire Council Archives in the Speirs Centre,  where there will also be an exhibition celebrating Alloa Pottery and a display about the new Clackmannanshire panel for the Great Tapestry of Scotland.  The former Devon Colliery Beam Engine House will be open again, as will  Tullibody Community Garden, which is encouraging people to grow their own food and eat more healthily. 

Please note that in some buildings only the ground floor is accessible to people with mobility difficulties. Please refer to the key next to each entry. Visitors enter the buildings at their own risk. Neither Clackmannanshire Heritage Trust nor any participating building owners are responsible for any accidents or damage incurred.

Our Doors Open Days weekend is 28th and 29th September.

Clackmannanshire

Alloa Speirs Centre

new

28 September 2019

The Speirs Centre was built as Alloa Public Baths and Gymnasium and was gifted by John Thomson Paton, Managing Director of John Paton, Son & Co. Ltd, KIlncraigs Mill. It was designed by John James Burnet, Son & Campbell. It opened on 29th April 1898. The building has been described as ‘one of Scotland’s finest public baths and gymnasiums’. It closed at the end of 1986, then reopened as a gymnastic centre on 13th January 1989 as The Speirs Centre, in memory of the Clackmannanshire boxer Tommy Speirs. It closed again in 2012 and reopened on 18th October 2014, with a new extension designed by LDN Architects. It  provides a wide range of services, including a library; local and family history research centre; Registry; customer services, county Archives and exhibitions on the history and heritage of the county. The Archives store will be open for booked tours; the design of the new Clackmannanshire panel for the Great Tapestry of Scotland and an exhibition celebrating Alloa Pottery will also be on display on the ground and mezzanine floors of the building.

Clackmannanshire

Alva Old Kirkyard and Johnstone Mausoleum

28-29 September 2019

The church of St Serf was rebuilt in 1632 but was demolished after a fire in 1985. Its ‘footprint’ remains, along with early gravestones in the kirkyard. The Erskine family had a burial vault beneath the church. The Johnstone Mausoleum was designed and built c1790 by Robert and James Adam for John Johnstone, who bought the Alva estate from James Erskine, Lord Alva, in 1775. It is one of only four Adam mausolea in Scotland. Eight members of the family are buried in the original mausoleum: an eastern extension was added in the 19th century to accommodate additional burials. The mausoleum has been conserved and the Old Kirkyard was restored as part of the Historic Kirkyards Trail project of the Ochils Landscape Partnership programme.

Clackmannanshire

Devon Colliery Beam Engine House

28-29 September 2019

Devon Colliery has had a long history, but flooding forced it to close in 1854. It was reopened in 1879 by Alloa Coal Company, which installed new pit-head plant, including the impressive Beam Engine House, which housed a Cornish-style beam pumping engine built by Neilson & Co in Glasgow in 1865. It could pump 2,560 gallons of water per minute out of the colliery. It was in operation until 1932, when electric pumps were installed. Devon Colliery closed in 1960 and the beam engine was partly dismantled. The Beam Engine House was restored by Clackmannan District Council in 1993, by which time only the massive cast-iron beam and part of the pump-rod remained. It is one of the few surviving beam engines in Scotland. It was converted to office space and, after sporadic use, was later sold to the Scottish SPCA, which is now developing plans to use it as an educational information centre.

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